Free Writer’s Workshop Wednesday: The Parts of Speech

Let’s for once and for all, break up any confusion about the parts of speech.

The phrase “Parts of Speech” simply refers to the names we give to each word in the English language, depending on what it is. Each part of speech performs a distinct job in a sentence.

There are eight Parts of Speech: noun, pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb, conjunction, preposition, and interjection.

Let’s take a look at each one and break it down.

What It Is

A noun is a person, a place, a thing, or an idea.

Examples: man, Paris, apple, love

What It Does

Nouns act as either the SUBJECT or the OBJECT of a sentence or phrase.

How to Find

Ask “Who or what?”

What it is

A word the replaces a noun in a sentence

What it does

Acts as the subject, objective or even possessive form in a sentence

How to find

Use the following image to help you find pronouns:

What It Is

A word that implies action or links the subject and predicate together.

What It Does

Tells was the subject does. (Action)

Tells what the subject is. (Linking)

How to Find

Once you identify the subject, ask “What is he/she/it/ doing?”

What It Is

A modifier, AKA: it DESCRIBES something

What It Does

Describes nouns and pronouns

How to Find

Ask, “Which? What kind of? How Many? How Much?”

What It Is

A modifier, AKA: they DESCRIBE something

What It Does

Describes verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs

How to Find

Ask, “How? When? Where? To What Extent? and sometimes Why?”

What It Is

Connecting words

What It Does

Connects words, phrases, clauses, and sentences.

How to Find

For coordinating conjunctions think: FANBOY–for, and, nor, but, or, yet

For subordinating conjunctions, get familiar with common conjunctions.

What It Is

A word that connects

What It Does

Shows the relationship of nouns to the rest of the sentence.
Entire prepositional phrase acts like a modifier.

How to Find

Words like: of, to, with, although, from, near, by, etc.

You can find a list of common prepositions in my Google slide presentation on prepositions at my TeachersPayTeachers store!

What It Is

One or more words used to express mild or strong emotion. (Note: IT IS NOT A PART OF THE SENTENCE!)

What It Does

Show an intense emotion interrupting the sentence. Example: Stop! There’s a car coming!

How to Find

Interjections are locate at the beginning of a sentence and separated with punctuation.

Mild emotion: punctuate with a comma or period.
Strong emotion: punctuate with an exclamation point.

For more great information on English, writing, and grammar, check out my Free Writer’s Workshop!

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